I’m studying and need help with a Health & Medical question to help me learn.

Post1-

What act stuck out to you the most? Why?

The entire audio entails people who recount the devastating happenings that occurred in New Orleans following the Katrina Floods. There are several things that have come to my mind after listening to that audio; agony, grief, and resilience. It is evident that the psychological scars still linger. Today, 15 years later, I feel and think that a number of these survivors continue to experience mental-health related problems following the storm. Most of them are people who need psychological support to reinstate their mental stability. The loss of sense of self and social network that accompany familiar surroundings and basic necessities lead to damaging psychological health complications.

What would you find the most challenging as someone involved in Emergency Management or as part of a Recovery team?

Looking at the entire story, there are numerous challenges that the people involved in the emergency response team encountered. First, I think the response to this disaster was challenging because the civilians within that state had embraced the culture of not assisting themselves. Coordination lacked within the local level. People lacked respect for the police who returned the same agitation to them. Looting was rampant.

Normally, in major natural disasters, until the local government gains control of the area, the federal government cannot intervene because they are not supposed to be the first responders. Therefore, the lack of civilian volunteers magnified the disaster therefore presenting a heavy and challenging task to the recovery team.

How might these experiences have been better prevented?

To curb such experiences, several measures could be put into play, and a civilian defense corps organization could work miraculously. This could be a group that can perform and organize civilian response in case of any disaster. A good example can be traced to Texas, where the civilian volunteers make up an army of assistance. Therefore, the government must start involving civilians in all of their disaster preparations plans because there will never be enough resources from the government to cover dangerous disasters.

What can we do to build more resilient communities BEFORE a disaster strikes, so the impact of such a disaster is lessened?

It should be noted that no single entity or sector has definitive responsibility for enhancing national resilience. Similarly, no definite federal agency has all of the responsibility or authority, all of the suitable sets of skills, or enough financial resources to tackle this escalating problem. However, I think that a vital responsibility for the mounting community lies with the residents. Guidance, input, and pledge from all levels of academia, state government, and from the private sector, and community-based and nongovernmental firms are required throughout the process of building a more resilient community.

In a nutshell, to build community resilience, a community should develop abilities in areas not limited to the active involvement of all community stakeholders in health event development and individual preparations, expansion of social networks, the formation of health-supporting to enhance both physical and psychological health of the community.

What must be done AFTER a disaster in this context to build community recovery and resilience?

A major way to start the post-disaster recovery planning procedure within the community is by hosting a forum. Such forums grant a platform for local governments and organizations within the community to share available resources and important information to better organize the community to recover from a tragic disaster. Additionally, these forums allow the members of the community, health experts, and the technical experts to work jointly to integrate knowledge, experience, and values to help the affected community. Through this, establishment of strategies to effectively respond to the post-disaster psychological and physical health requirements of the members of the community and reconstructing plans for social and health systems can then be immediately activated.

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POST2-

What act stuck out to you the most? Why?

The most act that stuck out to me is how some authorities fail to carry the duty of care to assist people in disasters. For example, the federal government’s role in supporting people in emergencies is crucial by rescuing people and providing shelter, food, and water to all the affected populations during disasters. Thus, the act stuck out to me is that when some authorities fail to provide buses, trucks, trains, and planes to evaluate victims by saying it is not their job (Glass, 2005). I am taking the Organizational Management and Communication course this semester, and I have learned that good leadership, particularly those working with organizations that respond to disasters, should not just think about their jobs and tasks. They should do their best to support the affected communities. This act stuck out to me because it shows how people compromise others’ safety during disasters simply because it is not their job.

What would you find the most challenging as someone involved in Emergency Management or as part of a Recovery team?

The most challenging thing that a person involved in Emergency Management or Recovery Team face is watching some victims suffer from the disaster’s impact. According to Denise Moore, it is heartbreaking to see victims suffering from dehydration, yet it is challenging to help them at that moment (Glass, 2005).

How might these experiences have been better prevented?

The best approaches to implement in preventing challenges faced by people working in disaster-affected areas are to equip them with all the necessary inputs that can assist the affected people. In that regard, the federal government and the state government need to collaborate to empower people working in the recovery team. For example, Denise Moore recalls how the victims of hurricanes shared food and water (Glass, 2005). Thus, the effects would have been prevented by allocating enough resources to cater for the victims. All the federal and state governments would have prevented these experiences by evaluating people when they received information about the disaster.

What can we do to build more resilient communities BEFORE a disaster strikes, so the impact of such a disaster is lessened?

The most important thing to do in developing more resilient communities before a disaster occurs is to detect and prevent disaster. Communities should not ignore warnings about a disaster to ensure adequate disaster management measures. Also, communities need to report any signs that may trigger a disaster.

What must be done AFTER a disaster in this context to build community recovery and resilience?

In most cases, a disaster causes deaths, injuries, and destruction of properties. Therefore, after a disaster, many people develop emotional distress and mental issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. In that regard, it should be done to provide medical support to the victims to ensure they recover from the trauma (Glass, 2005). It is also essential to compensate the victims to ensure they recover from financial losses. More importantly, it is crucial to evacuate the victims to new settlements until the disaster is adequately addressed.

Reference

Glass, I. (2005, September 9). After The Flood. This American Life Episode 296. Retrieved from https://www.thisamericanlife.org/296/after-the-flood (Links to an external site.).

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POST 3

1.What act stuck out to you the most? Why?

The thing that struck me most is the fact that people who had been displaced by the hurricanes could not be helped by the government which is supposed to protect them. The displaced people were living in deplorable conditions that the government through respective authorities would have resolved. It was wrong for the police and the national guard to turn away people on the bridge when they were; looking for a better place to stay. The police were shooting at the people and there were orders from the authorities for a shoot to kill on any person who crossed the bridge.

2.What would you find the most challenging as someone involved in Emergency Management or as part of a Recovery team?

The biggest problem in the management of such an incident is the dilemma that is presented by the authorities and the need for human help. Displaced persons needed help but the authorities could not allow the responders to get to the people. Bridging the gap between authorities and people needing humanitarian help ought to be driven by the overall goal to help humans. the coordination of all the required personnel in response to a disaster is of paramount importance and in this case, it was poorly done.

3.How might these experiences have been better prevented?

To prevent such experiences, there ought to be a coordination between the government authorities which include the police and the national guard and the responders to the humanitarian needs. The government authorities should have been involved in the response to the hurricanes by channeling the resources to evacuate people from the area when it before it worsened rather than blocking them from leaving the area as the situation continued to worsen.

4.What can we do to build more resilient communities BEFORE a disaster strikes so the impact of such a disaster is lessened?

To ensure that communities are resilient to such disasters, there is a need to ensure that the stakeholders in such a disaster are well-coordinated and perform prior grills and training on how to respond to such a disaster so that they can respond with ease and effectiveness. Educating people on what they can do when in such a problem to ensure that they can be able to get through. Another way is ensuring that there are enough resources in all situations such as responders, food, and water.

5.What must be done AFTER a disaster in this context to build community recovery and resilience?

Providing victims with basic needs such as food, water, and clothing. Another way is to support them to get jobs so that they can be able to resume their normal way of life. Providing victims with psychological support because they may suffer from trauma, hallucinations, and delusions is also important in re-establishing a disaster-destabilized community. Supporting the victims by giving them resources, finances or ways of making finances and integrating them into well-established societies or ones that have not been affected by the disaster can be a great way of re-building such a community.

Reference

Glass, I. (2005, September 9). After The Flood. This American Life Episode 296. Retrieved from https://www.thisamericanlife.org/296/after-the-flood

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Requirements:

Write one response for each post at least 200 words .

 

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